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“Empire, War, Globalization, and Korean America in Global and Transnational Perspectives”

Kevin Y. Kim, “Empire, War, Globalization, and Korean America in Global and Transnational Perspectives,” in Companion to Korean American Studies, ed. Rachael Miyung Joo and Shelley Sang-Hee Lee (Leiden: Brill, 2018), 47–76.

Drawing from his larger work on postcolonial Korea and U.S.-Asia relations, Kim’s essay, “Empire, War, Globalization, and Korean America in Global and Transnational Perspectives,” recasts Korean American history as a global and transnational phenomenon occurring at the discursive and material crossroads of Korea-centered globalization from the late nineteenth century decline of Chosŏn Korea and Korea’s colonization by Japan through the Cold War and 1990s-era neoliberal globalization. As Kim argues, Korean America comprised an “inter-imperial” diaspora emerging from the traumatic interstices of U.S.-Korea relations, particularly after World War II.

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