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CHID 433 A: Disability Law, Policy, And The Community I&s

Meeting Time: 
MW 9:30am - 11:20am
Location: 
MEB 103
SLN: 
12319
Instructor: 
Kurt Lewis Johnson

Syllabus Description:

DIS ST 433: Disability Law, Policy, and the Community

Winter, 2015

5 credits

 

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

Faculty:

Mark Harniss

Kurt Johnson

UW Office:

CHSB-104

BB-957

UW Mailbox:

357920

356490

UW Phone:

206.685.0289

206.543.3677

Email:

mharniss@uw.edu

kjohnson@uw.edu

  MEB 103

 

COURSE OVERVIEW

Disability Law, Policy & the Community is an interdisciplinary seminar for upper division undergraduate and graduate students designed for those interested in learning more about the legal rights of people with disabilities, history of disability policy in the United States and the role of community activism and other forces in policy development and systems change. The course provides students with an introduction to the existing social service systems that impact people with disabilities including Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, public education and health care. The course material is presented through lecture, class discussion, and field research. Students will be evaluated on class preparation and participation as well as the quality of the assignments.

 

GOALS

The goal of this course is to explore historical and emerging policy with respect to disability from the perspective of medical, social, civil rights, and economic models. The specific objectives of the course are that students will achieve the following:

  • An understanding of the history of the development of civil rights for people with disabilities and the influence of medical, social, and economic perspectives.
  • An understanding of the policy analysis process (examining policy, including legislation) from a disability perspective. A familiarity with federal and state laws against discrimination and the federal entitlement programs for people with disabilities and the relationship between laws and social policy.
  • An understanding of the elements of disability policy development and change in both micro (local) and macro (global) levels.
  • An awareness of critical grass roots constituents in policy development as well as non-consumer (e.g., corporate) influences.

 

CLASS AND READING SCHEDULE

Readings are due on the date listed unless otherwise specified. We reserve the right to change the course calendar at any time, including topics covered, reading assignments, and due dates for assignments and will give you as much notice as possible for such changes.

Dates

Activity

Presenter

Assignment

Jan 5

Course Introduction and Overview

Harniss/Johnson

 

Jan 7

Disability Policy Framework & Intro to Field Work

Harniss/Johnson

 

Jan 12

Disability Policy Framework (cont.)

Harniss/Johnson

 

Jan 14

The ADA and Social Policy

John Dineen

Discussion: ADA 

Jan 19

Martin Luther King Day—No class

 

 

Jan 21

Policy Analysis in Action

Noa Kay

Milestone 1: Topic

Jan 26

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Harniss/Johnson

Discussion 1

Jan 28

Accessibility in physical and electronic environments

Harniss/Johnson

Milestone 2: Background

Feb 2

Higher Education and Students with Disabilities

Cathy Fawley & Sam Garcia

Discussion 2

Feb 4

The Adult Service System

Pat Brown

Milestone 3: Sources

Feb 9

Health Systems 

Tracy Mroz

 

Feb 11

Policy Issues in Development Disability Support

Shannon Manion

Milestone 4: Outline

Feb 16

President’s Day—No class

 

 

Feb 18

Governor's Committee on Disability Issues and Employment

Toby Olson

Discussion 3

Feb 23

The Workforce Investment Act

Johnson

 

Feb 25

TBD

Johnson

 

March 2

Political Participation and Voting 

Harniss/Cook

Milestone 5: Draft

March 4

Seattle’s Mental Health Court

Russell Kurth 

 

March 9

Individual consultations

Harniss/Johnson

 

March 11

Poster Presentation

 

Milestone 6: Poster

March 18

Final Papers Due

 

Milestone 7: Final Paper

 

ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING PROCEDURES

We will assess your performance on course objectives through the following activities/assignments. Assignments can be found at the end of this syllabus and include detailed specification of the requirements and grading criteria. Assignments should be completed individually unless otherwise specified. We will grade as objectively as possible. In the case of qualitative assessment, evaluation will be based on our professional judgment. 

Assignments

% of Total

Milestone 1: Topic

5

Milestone 2: Background

5

Milestone 3: Sources & References

5

Milestone 4: Outline

10

Milestone 5: Draft

15

Milestone 6: Poster

20

Milestone 7: Final Paper

25

Participation (including discussion boards)

15

Total

100

 

We assign grades on the basis of a non-competitive percentage scale, which will be translated to the UW numeric scale using the following UW grade schedule.

We encourage you to try to avoid incomplete or “I” grades. This grade will only be assigned in cases of emergencies and where a passing grade may be earned. However, you should notify us at the time such circumstances exist. Upon notification, we will develop a course completion contract before the last week of the quarter outlining completion deadlines.

UW GRADING SCHEDULE

 

LETTER    %             UW NUMERIC

A                             97- 100                   4.0

                                94-96                     3.9

A-                            93                           3.8

                                92                           3.7

                                91                           3.6

                                90                           3.5

B+                           89                           3.4

                                88                           3.3

                                87                           3.2

B                              86                           3.1

                                85                           3.0

                                84                           2.9

                                83                           2.8

                                92                           2.7

                                81                           2.6

                                80                           2.5

 

LETTER    %             UW NUMERIC

C+                           79                           2.4

                                78                           2.3

                                77                           2.2

                                76                           2.1

                                75                           2.0

                                74                           1.9

C-                            73                           1.8

                                72                           1.7

                                71                           1.6

                                70                           1.5

D+                           69                           1.4

                                68                           1.3

                                67                           1.2

D                             66                           1.1

                                65                           1.0

                                64                            .9

D-                            63-62                       .8

                                61-60                      .7

E                              59-0                         0

 

READINGS

Required readings will be assigned weekly and can be found on the course website.

 

IN-CLASS PARTICIPATION

Careful preparation for, and participation during, class is critical. Participation points are the basis for a portion of your grade. You are responsible for (a) studying the content covered in class lectures, handouts, discussions and activities, and (b) satisfying criteria for in-class assignments by engaging in in-class and online discussions, relating content to discussions from previous classes or readings, and applying course information to problems. You are also encouraged to prepare and present questions when information is unclear.

 

OUTSIDE-OF-CLASS PARTICIPATION

Much of our work in-class will be to prepare you to learn outside of class. Since we have limited class time, your effort after class will be particularly important. In general, the university assumes that students will spend three hours outside of class for every credit hour they take. Thus, for a 5-credit class you should expect to spend 15 hours learning and working outside of class each week. This outside work will include reading, participating in online discussions and completion of your assignments.

 

WORK COMPLETION

  1. Please complete and turn in all assignments at or before the class meeting on the assigned due date. Early submission of assignments for feedback is encouraged. To be fair to other students, we will generally not accept unexcused late assignments. If you have a significant problem that interferes with your ability to meet a deadline, contact us and with our advance permission, you may be allowed to turn in a late assignment. Timelines for excused late assignments must be negotiated between us, and you may lose 10% of the total points for every day late.
  2. Prepare all your written assignments in a professional manner. Narrative parts of the assignment should either be typed or neatly hand-written and proofed carefully for spelling, punctuation, and grammar. We will return products that are unreadable or prepared in an unprofessional manner to you and may assign a lower grade.

 

ADDITIONAL WRITING ASSISTANCE

We will provide extensive feedback to students on their written products; however, students who experience difficulty in writing are strongly encouraged to make use of the Writing & Research Center (Room 121, Odegaard Undergraduate Library, 206.221.0972, https://depts.washington.edu/owrc/).

 

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

You are expected to maintain high standards of academic conduct. Plagiarism and cheating are a violation of the UW Student Conduct Code. For more information about the types of behavior that constitute plagiarism and cheating and the consequences of such behavior, read Student Academic Responsibility.

 

ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS

Students with disabilities need not disclose. To request academic accommodations due to disability, please contact:

Disability Resources for Students (DRS)
448 Schmitz Hall,
Box 355839 Seattle, WA 98195-5839
uwdss@u.washington.edu
206-543-8924 (Voice) 206-543-8925 (TTY) 206-616-8379 (FAX)

 

 

 

Catalog Description: 
Addresses the history of legal rights of disabled people, U. S. disability policy, and the role of community activism and other forces in policy development and systems change. Introduces the existing social service system that affects disabled people. Offered: jointly with DIS ST 433/LSJ 433.
GE Requirements: 
Diversity (DIV)
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Other Requirements Met: 
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 28, 2016 - 9:11am
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