CHID 222 A: Biofutures

Biofutures

Course Flyer: 
Summer Term: 
Full-term
Meeting Time: 
TTh 1:50pm - 4:00pm
Location: 
PAR 213
SLN: 
10759
Instructor:
Phillip Thurtle

Syllabus Description:

  • What are the ethical and legal issues involved in patenting human cell lines?
  • How are recent biotechnologies portrayed in science fiction films? What can we learn by studying these portrays?
  • What does it mean to suggest that biotechnology is part of "an information society"? 
  • How are race, class, gender, and disability mapped onto or intersect with biomedicine?
  • How are artists using live organisms in their art work? What can we learn about art, ethics, and scientific practice by studying this work?
  • How do scientists manipulate space and time in the laboratory?

This class explores key legal, ethical, cultural, scientific, and commercial aspects of the rapidly changing world of biotechnology and bioinformatics. It specifically asks how new discoveries in biology encourage us to rethink issues of ownership, communication, geography, identity, and artistic practice.

Come find out about the often exhilarating and frequently frightening scenarios for the future of your body. This class is designed to appeal to all. No prerequisites needed! 

Additional Details:

What are the ethical and legal issues involved in patenting human cell lines?d

 

How are recent biotechnologies portrayed in science fiction films? What can we learn by studying these portrayals?

 What does it mean to suggest that biotechnology is part of "an information society"?

 

 How are race, class, gender, and disability mapped onto or intersected with biomedicine?

How are artists using live organisms in their art work? What can we learn about art, ethics, and scientific practice by studying this work?

 How do scientists manipulate space and time in the laboratory?

 

 This class explores key legal, ethical, cultural, scientific, and commercial aspects of the rapidly changing world of biotechnology and bioinformatics. It specifically asks how new discoveries in biology encourage us to rethink issues of ownership, communication, geography, identity, and artistic practice.

 

Come find out about the often exhilarating and frequently frightening scenarios for the future of your body. This class is designed to appeal to all. No prerequisites needed!

hat does it mean to suggest that biotechnology is part of "an information society"?

 

 

 

 

How are race, class, gender, and disability mapped onto or intersected with biomedicine?

 

 

 

 

How are artists using live organisms in their art work? What can we learn about art, ethics, and scientific practice by studying this work?

 

 

 

 

How do scientists manipulate space and time in the laboratory?

ing these portrayals?

 

What does it mean to suggest that biotechnology is part of "an information society"?

 

What are the ethical and legal issues involved in patenting human cell lines?

 

How are recent biotechnologies portrayed in science fiction films? What can we learn by studying these portrayals?

 

What does it mean to suggest that biotechnology is part of "an information society"?

 

How are race, class, gender, and disability mapped onto or intersected with biomedicine?

 

How are artists using live organisms in their art work? What can we learn about art, ethics, and scientific practice by studying this work?

 

How are race, class, gender, and disability mapped onto or intersected with biomedicine?

 

How are artists using live o

 

Catalog Description: 
Explores key legal, ethical, cultural, scientific, and commercial aspects of the rapidly changing world of biotechnology and bioinformatics. Specifically asks how new discoveries in biology encourage us to rethink issues of ownership, communication, geography, identity, and artistic practice.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Natural World (NW)
Other Requirements Met: 
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 28, 2016 - 9:11am