CHID 480 A: Special Topics: Advanced Study Of The History Of Ideas

Decolonizing the Diet: Toward an Indigenous Veganism

Course Flyer: 
Meeting Time: 
MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
Location: 
CHL 105
SLN: 
12366
Instructor:
Claudia Serrato

Syllabus Description:

UPDATED FOR LAST FOUR WEEKS:

Wednesday, Nov. 12th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

 

  • Menu Designing Workshop and Selection of Cooking Teams
  • Zine Work

 

**Sign Ups for Presentations next week

 

(Public Talk on Nov.13th 4-6pm, room TBD by Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee Nation), “Why We Eat Our Relatives: The Predation Paradox of Other-Than-Human Kinship”)

Readings:

 

  • Peña, D., “Turtle Island First Foods: Deep Food for Native Health: Restoring Heritage Cuisines

and Indigenous Agroecosystems Environmental and Food Justice” *Reading Assign. On Canvas

 

Monday, Nov. 17th:   Modern Indigenous Cuisine, Resilience, and Recovery

Assignments/

Activities:

  • Native/Indigenous Chef Interview Presentations and one page biographies

Readings:

 

  • Nephi, C., “A Starting Point: Apaches in the Kitchen” (blog)
  • Cajete, G., “Plants, Food, Medicine, and Gardening” (book chapter)

 

Wednesday, Nov. 19th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Native/Indigenous Chef Interview Presentations and one page biographies
  • First draft of Zine pages DUE (in Word document, emailed to Claudia no later than 9pm)

Readings:

 

  • Salmón, E., “A New American Indian Cuisine” (book chapter)
  • Nephi, C., “Indigenous Culinary Culture Building 2013: Apaches in the Kitchen” (blog)
  • Nephi, C., “A Place in History: Apaches in the Kitchen” (blog)

 

Monday, Nov. 24th:   Activating Indigenous Taste Memories

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • IN CLASS finalizing Menu Designs

**NO READINGS

Wednesday, Nov. 26th                                                                                                                      Day of the Covenant

Assignments/

Activities:

  • Second draft of Zine DUE (in Word document, emailed to Claudia no later than 9pm)

Readings:

 

  • Marshall, W., “Tasting Earth: Healing, Resistance Knowledge, and the Challenge to Dominion”
  • Nelson, M. and Mohawk, J., “From the First to the Last Bite: Learning from the Food Knowledge of Our Ancestors”
  • Krohn, E. and Segrest, V., “Revitalizing Northwest Coastal Indian Food Culture” (book chapter)

 

Monday, Dec. 1st:    Revitalizing Native/Indigenous Cuisine and Decolonization

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Menu and Cooking Demonstrations
  • Final draft of Zine DUE (in Word document, emailed to Claudia no later than 12pm-strict)

**NO READINGS

Wednesday, Dec. 3rd

Assignments/

Activities:

  • Menu and Cooking Demonstrations

 

Monday, Dec. 8th:  Full Circle/Final 2:30-4:20pm

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Decolonial Food For Thought Zine Sharing
  • Eat and Celebrate!

 

 

ORIGINAL:

“Decolonizing the Diet: Towards an Indigenous Veganism”

Comparative History of Ideas 480, SLN 12366, 5 credits

 

“We can only do so much to combat racism and prejudice, but we can control what we put in our mouths…We must take responsibility for our health and for the well-being of…[the] future generations.”—D.A. Mihesuah

 

Claudia Serrato, Ph.C .                                             

Email: serratoc@uw.edu

Cell: 626-252-3850 (text)

Office hours: Mon. 12-1pm & Wed. 4-5pm @ Burke Café

Gatherings: Mondays/Wednesdays 1:30-3:20pm, CHL 105

 

Philosophy and Ways of Learning Under Three Full Moons

As an educator committed to community growth, social change, justice, and healing, informed by revolutionary models of education and pedagogy; I provide students an opportunity to engage with my leadership style of co-intentional teaching which embodies traditional ecological knowledges and principles of co-existence and accountability, creating a safer, transformative, and engaging space to learn.

 

This course in particular is designed to provide an alterNative learning experience which learning outcomes can be directly applied to the diverse worlds students live in. For the next three full moons, ten weeks, we will read, dialogue, journal, debate, question, respond, peer-review, write, create, collaborate, cook, and work towards building a healthy future by embracing both a different way of learning and a different way of teaching each-other through active learning which is designed to provide us with hands on approaches on Decolonizing the Diet: Towards an Indigenous Veganism.

 

Course Description

A decolonial food movement in the Americas based on the four Indigenous principles of responsibility, respect, relationship, and reciprocity has cultivated a strong critique on the dominant food systems’ politics, systems of food production, and nutritional recommendations. This course introduces (de)colonial readings (books, journals, blogs, and alterNative media sources) to students of these particular critiques, bridging the Indigenous led decolonial food movement with critical food studies and critical animal studies through methodologies of historical foodways and community health analysis, while engaging in the praxis of decolonizing one’s diet.

 

Student Learning Goals: Nourishing and Cultivating New Recipes towards Decolonization

  •     As a process of inquiry and investigation employ a decolonial framework centered on Indigenous food epistemologies
  •     Develop fundamental reading, interview, and research methods of questioning and challenging assumptions underlying dominant food and health discourse
  •     Identify and explain the intricate relationships that exist between food, health and (de)colonization
  •     Engage with various culinary art traditions through sensory ways of knowing and practice

 

Multidisciplinary readings will compliment and guide our learning processes while providing a direction towards a healthy present and a healthy future.

These include a combination of peer reviewed journal articles, book chapters, blog postings, and alterNative multimedia forms accessible via our Canvas webpage: https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/920268

 

Major Seminar Assignments/Responsibilities

There are four assignments for this course: Native/Indigenous Chef Interview, Critical Reflective Food Essay, Recipe and Cooking Demonstration, Decolonial Food for Thought Collaborative Zine

 

Native/Indigenous Chef Interview:

For this assignment, you will interview a Native/Indigenous Chef located anywhere in Turtle Island/America. As a good relative, outreaching early is one way of building good relations. The autumn season tends to be a very busy cooking season for chefs, so please keep this into consideration. This interview can be done via Skype, Phone Call, In-person, and other electronic means of communication. To assist in your search and outreach, a recommend list of chefs will be provided to you. We will be developing interview questions in class and practicing interviewing techniques. A written one to two-page biographical narrative and a 10-minute in class presentation is expected.  All interviews should be completed before Nov. 5th. More info. will be provided.

 

Critical Reflective Food Essay:

This midterm will be a take home essay in which students will have the opportunity to begin developing their ideas in relation to the readings, class discussions, and activities while receiving peer-to-peer feedback in the classroom space. The final essay will be 4-6 pages in length and will include a Chicago style bibliography due on Nov. 3rd.

 

Menu/Recipe and Cooking Demonstration:

This assignment will compliment the Native/Indigenous Chef interviews in which groups of students will prepare a menu/recipes from the tribal/regional/heritage cuisine of the Chefs interviewed. These meals will be shared and presented to the classroom community. Each recipe will include a one-page cultural foodways history, nutritional elements, and an ecological sketch. More info. will be provided. Final recipe write-ups and cooking demos will take place on Dec. 1st and 3rd.

 

Decolonial Food For Thought Collaborative Zine:

This final will be a collaborative class project. We will determine our interests and skills, then delegate assignments towards a finished product that will demonstrate and provide a clear working definition of decoloniality and Indigenous Veganism, highlight Native/Indigenous Chefs, present cultural heritage cuisines and recipes, snippets of our learning processes, and a guide towards Decolonizing the Diet that will be shared with our campus communities. Final Due on Dec. 1st  

 

Grading

Class Participation & Attendance.…………………….……………………………………………….10pts

Native/Indigenous Chef Interview…………………………………………………………….………..20pts

Midterm Critical Reflective Food Essay……..…….………………………………………….…….....30pts

Recipe and Cooking Demonstration……………………………………………………………………20pts

Decolonial Food For Thought Zine Presentation…….………..……………………………………….20pts

 

Total…………………………………………………………………………………………..……….100pts

 

Grades are based on the UW Standard Grading System:

 

A         4.0       100-99             B+        3.4       88-87               B-        2.8       76-75

            3.9       98-97                           3.3       86-85                           2.7       74-73

A-        3.8       96-95                           3.2       84-83

            3.7       94-93                           3.1       82-81  

            3.6       92-91               B          3.0       80-79

            3.5       90-89                           2.9       78-77

 

Gathering Principles for Positive Relations and Effective Student Centered Learning

Relationship: En Lak’ech (you are my other me)

We enter this space together with all of our ancestors and the embodied memories of our past. I ask that we practice mindfulness and stay present with this knowledge so that we reflect the best of each other. Our multiple ways of knowing and practicing diversity in our ways of being is important to creating and making this space and time together warm and engaging. Let us place our best principles of working as a community of learners so that our gatherings become safer spaces of critical radical learning where all knowledge and ways of knowing, learning, and doing is respected and encouraged.

 

Responsibility: Community

As a community of engaged learners, outside worldly technologies can disrupt the synergies created during our gatherings/time together. In the spirit of practicing self-accountability as responsibility as community-accountability; these technologies will be used for proposed directly related class activities. We all are on the path of learning and distractions can take away from that process. Let us enter this space prepared to do work! This means, bringing in all your supplies, have done the readings, assignments, and be ready to engage in deep thought, reflection, and participation. If we require accommodations, which have not already been prearranged, please make me aware so that we make this space accommodating.

 

Reciprocity: Learning Circles

Once we begin and are in our learning flow, let us be ready to engage all of who we are by invoking our sensory ways of knowing and by practicing responsibility and relationship building which both are methods of being accountable to learning. This will help with our ways of being in the world, which is to be present in our every moment of being. In this respect, we will also learn to form braids of everyday knowledge to enhance our learning experiences.

 

Redistribution: Sharing

This space is for us to explore, enact the three previous principles to guide how we pass it forward. If we happen to notice that we are having trouble with accomplishing our tasks, let us extend ourselves by stretching our hands and if we can, turn our backs into bridges, so that we all walk together in this profound way of active student centered learning. This experience is not a competition it is a tread towards liberation. In this respect, let us not use or abuse intellectual knowledge/s as our own without giving the proper recognition. Honesty is key!

 

Accommodations for Disability & Learning Differences

The University of Washington is committed to providing access, equal opportunity and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, education and employment for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodations contact the Disability Services Office at least 10 days in advance at: (206) 543-6450/V, (206) 543-6452/TTY, (206) 685-7264 (FAX), or dso@u.washington.edu.

  

Weekly Reading and Assignment/Activity Schedule

Sept. 24th: Introductions, Course Agreements, and Overview

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Interviewing and introducing classmates
  • In class writing reflection

Readings:

 

  • Find, read, and take notes of a blog post or a reading on any social media site that speaks to the revitalization of Indigenous Cuisines, Decolonial food ways, and Indigenous health & nutrition

 

 

Sept. 29th:  Encountering Decoloniality and Indigeneity

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Identify a Native/Indigenous Chef to interview
  • Research and background on Chef

Readings:

 

  • Maria Lugones, “Towards a Decolonial Feminism”
  • Nelson, M., Cajete, G., & Mohawk, J., “Re-indigenization Defined”
  • Harris, LD. And Wasilewski, J., “Indigeneity, an Alternative Worldview: Four R's (Relationship, Responsibility, Reciprocity, Redistribution) vs. two P's (Power and Profit). Sharing the Journey Towards Conscious Evolution”

 

Oct. 1st

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Begin Developing Interview Questions
  • Critical Reflective Probing Exercises

Readings:

 

  • Walter Mignolo, “Decolonizing Western Epistemology/Building Decolonial Epistemologies”
  • Morgensen, S.,  “White Settlers and Indigenous Solidarity: Confronting White Supremacy,

Answering Decolonial Alliances”

 

 

 

Oct. 6th:   Cultivating a Critical Food and Animal Studies

Assignments/

Activities:

 

 

  • Interview Questions DUE
  • Research on Zines. What are they?

Readings:

 

  • Boggs, C., “Corporate Power, Ecological Crisis, and Animal Rights”
  • Evans, A., & Miele, M., “Between Food and Flesh: How Animals are Made to Matter

                   (and not matter) within Food Consumption Practices”

  • Wilk, R.,“The limits of discipline: Towards Interdisciplinary Food Studies”

 

Oct. 8th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Sketching a Decolonial Food Zine

Readings:

 

 

  • Hirschler, Christopher A. “An Examination of Vegan’s Beliefs and Experiences Using Critical

Theory and Autoethnography”

  • Janda, Swinder, and Philip J. Trocchia. “Vegetarianism: Toward a Greater Understanding”

 

 

 

 

Oct. 13th:  Historicizing Culinary Imperialism and Indigenous Gastronomies                  Indigenous Peoples Day

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Leadership Role and Skills towards a Decolonial Food Zine

Readings:

 

  • Montanari, M., “Food Systems and Models of Civilization”
  • Earle, R., “Food and the Colonial Experience”

 

Oct. 15th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  •  Re-Sketching a Decolonial Food Zine

Readings:

 

  • Earle, R., “Protecting the European Body”
  • Earle, R., “You Will Become Like Them If You Eat Their Food”

 

 

 

Oct. 20th:  Exposing Nonhuman Animal and Processed Food Industries                                           Birth of the Báb

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Critical Reflective Food Essay Outlines DUE

Readings:

 

  • Winson, A., “The Industrial Diet: The Degradation of Food and the Struggle for Healthy Eating”
  • Wise, M., “Colonial Beef and the Blackfeet Reservation Slaughterhouse, 1879-1895”

 

Oct. 22nd

Assignments/

Activities:

 

 

  • Building Collaborative Zine Teams
  • Identifying Skills

Readings:

 

  • Nagata, JM, et.al, “Coca-colonization and Hybridization of Diets among the Tz'utujil Maya”
  • Mohawk, J., “Indians and Sugar: Thoughts on Nutrition, Disease

 

 

 

Oct. 27th:  Approaches Towards Decolonizing the Diet

Assignments/

Activities

  • Critical Reflective Food Essay Drafts DUE
  • Peer-Reviews

 

Readings:

 

  • Bodirsky, M. and Johnson, J., “Decolonizing Diet: Healing by Reclaiming Traditional

Indigenous Foodways”

  • Esquibel, C. and Calvo, L., “Decolonize Your Diet”

 

Oct. 29th

Assignments/

Activities:

  • Mid-quarter Review and Evaluations
  • Towards a Decolonial Food For Thought Zine Project Beak out Sessions

 

Readings:

 

  • Mihesuah, D., “Decolonizing Our Diets By Recovering Our Ancestors' Gardens”
  • Mundel, E. & Chapman, G., “A Decolonizing Approach to Health Promotion in Canada: The

Case of the Urban Aboriginal Community Kitchen Garden Project”

 

 

Nov. 3rd:  Towards an Indigenous Veganism

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Midterm Critical Reflective Food Essay DUE
  • Designing a Zine

Readings:

 

 

Nov. 5th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Draft of Native/Indigenous Chef Interview DUE
  • Recipes Selected

Readings:

 

  • Robinson, M., “Veganism and Mi'kmaq Legends”
  • Robinson, M., “Indigenous Veganism: Feminist Natives do Eat Tofu” 
  • Decolonial Food For Thought, “Indigenous Veganism”
  • Serrato, C., “Ecological Indigenous Foodways and the Healing of All Our Relations”    

           

 

Nov. 10th:   Cultivating Healthy Recipes, Indigenous Nutrition, and Health

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Native/Indigenous Chef Biographical Narrative/Interview DUE
  • Menu Designs

Readings:

 

  • Milburn, M., “Indigenous Nutrition: Using Traditional Food Knowledge to Solve Contemporary

Health Problems”

  • LaDuke, W. “Food as Medicine: The Recovery of Traditional Food to Heal the People in

Recovering the Sacred”

Nov. 12th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

 

  • Recipes Background Information Gathered
  • ReDesigning a Zine

 

(Public Talk on Nov.13th 4-6pm, room TBD by Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee Nation), “Why We Eat Our Relatives: The Predation Paradox of Other-Than-Human Kinship”)

Readings:

 

  • Peña, D., “Turtle Island First Foods: Deep Food for Native Health: Restoring Heritage Cuisines

and Indigenous Agroecosystems Environmental and Food Justice”

  • Cajete, G., “Plants, Food, Medicine, and Gardening”

 

 

 

Nov. 17th:   Modern Indigenous Cuisine, Resilience, and Recovery

Assignments/

Activities:

  • Native/Indigenous Chef Interview Presentations

Readings:

 

  • Nephi, C., “A Starting Point: Apaches in the Kitchen”
  • Wiedman, Dennis. “Native American Embodiment of the Chronicities of Modernity: Reservation

Food, Diabetes, and the Metabolic Syndrome among the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache”

Nov. 19th

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Native/Indigenous Chef Interview Presentations
  • Zine drafts DUE

Readings:

 

  • Salmón, E., “A New American Indian Cuisine”
  • Nephi, C., “Indigenous Culinary Culture Building 2013: Apaches in the Kitchen”
  • Nephi, C., “A Place in History: Apaches in the Kitchen”

 

Nov. 24th:   Activating Indigenous Taste Memories

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • One Page Drafts of Native/Indigenous Recipe Stories Due
  • Finalizing Menu’s

Readings:

 

 

Nov. 26th:                                                                                                                                          Day of the Covenant

Assignments/

Activities:

  • Second draft of Zine DUE

Readings:

 

  • Marshall, W., “Tasting Earth: Healing, Resistance Knowledge, and the Challenge to Dominion”
  • Nelson, M. and Mohawk, J., “From the First to the Last Bite: Learning from the Food Knowledge of Our Ancestors”
  • Krohn, E. and Segrest, V., “Revitalizing Northwest Coastal Indian Food Culture”

 

 

 

Dec. 1st:    Revitalizing Native/Indigenous Cuisine and Decolonization

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Menu/Recipe and Cooking Demonstrations
  • Final draft of Zine DUE

Readings:

 

 

Dec. 3rd

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Menu/Recipe and Cooking Demonstrations

Readings:

 

 

 

 

Dec. 8th:  Full Circle/Final 2:30-4:20pm

Assignments/

Activities:

 

  • Decolonial Food For Thought Zine Sharing
  • Eat and Celebrate!

 

**Course readings WILL BE added, revised & adjusted slightly as we proceed through the quarterr

 

 

A decolonial food movement in the Americas based on the four Indigenous principles of responsibility, respect, relationship, and reciprocity has cultivated a strong critique on the dominant food systems’ politics, systems of food production, and nutritional recommendations. This course introduces (de)colonial readings (books, journals, blogs, and alterNative media sources) to students of these particular critiques, bridging the Indigenous led decolonial food movement with critical food studies and critical animal studies through methodologies of historical foodways and community health analysis, while engaging in the praxis of decolonizing one’s diet.

 

UPDATED syllabus.Nov.10.2014.pdf

Decolonizing the Diet.Towards an Indigenous Veganism Syllabus.docx

 

Catalog Description: 
Examines a different subject or problem from a comparative framework with an interdisciplinary perspective. Satisfies the Gateways major/minor requirement. Offered: AWSp.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 28, 2016 - 9:11am